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Posted 10.6.05

 Case Western Reserve University’s Weatherhead School of Management wants to redesign management education, and it is inviting the entire university, as well as outside experts, to help with the ambitious undertaking.


    Weatherhead is holding a three day “summit” during which it will look at the future of management education, particularly in areas of sustainable development, corporate social responsibility and business social entrepreneurship. The summit, which will take place October 19-21 in the Thwing Center on the Case campus, is being held under the auspices of the school’s Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit (BAWB). All Weatherhead faculty, staff, and students have been invited, as well as other Case faculty and administrators and outside stakeholders.


    “With the increasingly global world economy and the trend towards privatization, it is clear that the business sector’s sphere of influence has never been greater,” said Myron Roomkin, dean and Albert J. Weatherhead, III Professor of Management. “Management schools need to examine their curricula in order to see how the goals of business can be better integrated with larger goals such as fighting poverty and building sustainable ecosystems. This summit will provide a roadmap for business schools everywhere for undertaking that process.”


    In seeking to mesh management education with a wider vision of global benefit, Weatherhead is part of a growing trend among business schools. In recent years schools as diverse as The George Washington University School of Business and Public Management, the University of Michigan Steven M. Ross School of Business, the Stanford University School of Business and the Yale Graduate School of Business have significantly revamped their curricula to focus more on social, environmental and ethical issues.


      A further purpose of the event, Roomkin said, is to promote and expand the vision of BAWB into a “school within a school” at Weatherhead. “Our goal is for BAWB to be far more action-oriented than a mere academic center” Roomkin said. “It is meant to be much broader and multi-disciplinary, offering degree programs, majors and minors, workshops, and global initiatives.”


    The idea for the summit grew out of the Weatherhead School’s participation, along with 10 other leading graduate schools of business, in the “Teaching Innovation” program sponsored by the Aspen Institute’s Business and Society program. (www.aspenbsp.org). Each participating school is conducting a pilot project designed to address challenges and opportunities in areas such as social impact management, corporate social responsibility, and values-based leadership. The summit is Weatherhead’s contribution to the program.


    A report on the summit’s proceedings and outcomes, including general recommendations for infusing social impact management and social responsibility into management school’s curricula, will be available shortly after the conclusion of the summit.

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